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Want to learn some programming languages, help!

Discussion in 'Tech & Programming' started by TheArsonist, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. eielliott87

    eielliott87 New Member

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    Srsly? What is about C or C++? These languages are much terrible but are more used in the world.
     
  2. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    C and C++ are leagues above Javascript in terms of usefullness and not being complete ass to work with.

    You want terrible? Try using Erlang for anything other than what it's supposed to do.

    People just tend to hate on them because either a) they suck at pointers b) it's too "hard" for other reasons or c) they don't want to use it/don't want to go into a field where it is used (a perfectly valid reason).

    Obviously not everyone wants or needs to do low level stuff; but it's speed and level of access to memory are nigh unmatched outside of assembly.

    Javascript on the other hand does one thing, and it does it mediocrely at that. It's also much more of a hassle to work with (at least in my opinion).

    C++ is also used a lot in game development (especially the engine side things).
     
  3. Animus2280

    Animus2280 Member

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    I don't know about "the world," but Javascript is far more prominent in the USA.

    C++ problems are usually trivial issues like knowing where to put the const keyword (yea, the developers can kill themselves for that shit). Javascript has more fundamental issues and its popularity is directly a result of...ahem, the coding hype I harped on and on about in my previous post and "open source" meaning any dumbass can contribute to a project on github, 99% of which will probably never see the light of day.

    I'm not doing programming/coding grunt work (they call it "engineering," which is cute) for my career so I really couldn't care less. These are just my observations, and I tend to get aggressive when I see bullshit being thrown around and people swallowing it whole.
     
    ZealotCatfish and Eli_Green like this.
  4. eielliott87

    eielliott87 New Member

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    As for me, a lot of engineers, nowadays, chase the trends and use The Programming languages like Python, because it is popular and fashionable. For me, Javascript is more powerful and more useful language.
     
  5. Skulls_n_Souls

    Skulls_n_Souls Member

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    Hey guys.

    I'm a recent dental school graduate, but I've always been interested in programming. Now that I've got some time on my hand I want to get to it.

    That being said, i have no experience whatsoever in programming. Do the links you guys provided still work for me? Or do I need to like read an intorduction to programming book or something? 'Cause OP said they had some experience and I dont.

    Thank you in advance.

    @iser @Blarrg @dewouter
     
  6. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    Python, Java/C#, C/C++ are all relatively easy to get started with; kind of comes down to what you want to do though.

    If you just want to fuck around Python is probably your best bet.

    Googling X language + tutorial will be enough to get you started with most, and there's stack overflow/here if you get stuck and can't find stuff.
     
  7. dewouter

    dewouter Moderator Staff Member

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    Python would be a good choice, lua might even be better. Lua is very easy and doesn't require so many different variable declarations or pointers. There are millions of tutorials for every language so that should indeed be fine.
     
  8. Skulls_n_Souls

    Skulls_n_Souls Member

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    Thank you @Eli_Green and @dewouter

    I didn't think I'd find this much tutorials online for free, that's why I went here.
    I downloaded Python (3.6) and, to work with this PDF on python , I downloaded a program called Pyscripter. However, whenever I run it an error would appear saying Python could not be initialized. When I start Python no error occurs, though.

    The error in addition to info on my computer are presented in the image. I tried all solutions I could find and none seem to work, including these. (most other websites posted a link to this as a solution for the problem.)


    error.jpg

    E: even tried installing an earlier version of python. didn't work.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  9. dewouter

    dewouter Moderator Staff Member

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  10. mapdesigner

    mapdesigner Member

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    Hello,

    Do you like warcraft 3? if yes, then learning how to make maps and triggers is fun place to begin: do what you like, and learn in the process.

    I have examples of from warcraft 3 maps made by blizzard and when you look at the triggers it will be easy to learn. (basically I extracted them from warcraft files)


    all programming languages are more or less the same: once you learn any, you can easily learn others. the good thing about trigger editor is that you can learn it entirely by yourself because there is a GUI. programming languages all follow more or less the same logic, but the difference is how these programming languages represt such logic. old languages have bad way to represent (Fortran, C), while newer languages have more user friendly ways (Java, python)
     
    Skulls_n_Souls likes this.
  11. Skulls_n_Souls

    Skulls_n_Souls Member

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    Hey.
    So I've been fooling around with Python for a while, until someone I know gave me an advice to learn Kotlin instead of Python.

    What's your opinion about this?
     
  12. Eli_Green

    Eli_Green Member

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    Well I didn't even knkw it was a thing until you posted about it, but if it suits your needs sure.
     
  13. carlvic

    carlvic Moderator Staff Member

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    If you want to program, but you want to have fun. To the encoding method to practice the code, in fact, with the game programming logic. -rough translation.
     
  14. iser

    iser Member

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    hey, just coming back to this thread. i posted here when i was just starting to learn how to code. then, i was able to find a job as a software engineer within 6 months at a great company (heh, yes, doing the grunt work that animus is making fun of).

    and i started from freecodecamp.org. and it worked. now, i'm enjoying going to work and having fun coding all day.

    if your goal is to become a system engineer, then you will most likely need a cs degree unless you are some latent genius. however, if you want to enter web development (right now, react is popular for the frontend, and node is popular for the backend), get started on freecodecamp.org.

    web engineering is a different kind of coding than what animus is talking about. just be aware that 'coding' is not always about the web. game development. system development. there are many paths to software engineering, but learning frameworks like react/angular/vue/node/rails is the easiest and the fastest way to enter the field.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  15. dewouter

    dewouter Moderator Staff Member

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    Glad to see you are back, and that you found a job. I was thinking about making the switch too, started learning javascript/typescript and the frameworks that go with it. Ideally I would learn something else as javascript, but C++ or java without degree in CS seems rarer.

    Freecodecamp.org might be good to start, but the pace is so extremely low I can't take it. I thought I just start learning by making stuff. I'll start with a chess board with moves validation.
     
  16. iser

    iser Member

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    typescript is great. i'm a huge fan of strong-typing in js. i like flow a little better, but ts is perfectly fine, and it is what i use at work.

    fCC is only for people without any coding experience. if you feel that is too slow, then building a portfolio project is great. i cloned slack with react/rails.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  17. Blarrg

    Blarrg Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  18. ZealotCatfish

    ZealotCatfish Member

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    First thing I thought of
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Smaug

    Smaug Member

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    I personally found that it doesn't really matter what language you start with, however you better use something that you can actually do the stuff with that you like. For example, if you like making games, C# may be a great start since you can use it straight in Unity. If you want to make flashy websites, using Javascript in conjunction with a framework like vue.js/Vuetify can also be a pleasant experience.

    I'm currently working for a company that uses Go. I got in there as a Junior dev without any real knowledge about Go, but because I already had >10 years of programming with all kinds of different languages and tools, it was no problem for me to get into.

    Starting with something like Assembler or C++ can also be great btw if you are very curious to understand how your computer actually executes your program. In fact, ASM was the first language that I did some serious programming in simply because it was nice to know that everything I did would exactly work like it did (asm is fairly easy in terms of concept as it's pretty close to machine code; you don't have things like variables and functions, etc; it's just tough to write real world programs in it).
     
    Skulls_n_Souls likes this.
  20. rexie00000

    rexie00000 New Member

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    If you have basic programming it's not hard to switch or learn new language but if you are completely new better start with c++ just to learn basic. C++ is very powerful language, although many people would argue for beginner c++ isnt good as starter but IMO c++ very good to learn basic programming fundamentals. While your ultimate goal to make games naturally would lead you to learn C++, it is even more important to learn some fundamentals of computer science while learning programming.